Sinatra vs Bublé (The Summer Wind), The Engine Room, Wellington March/April 2011

Sinatra vs Bublé (The Summer Wind) is the second exhibition in a series of works using stick insects, again developed with evolutionary scientist, Dr Steve Trewick. In this work we observed 10 (non-hearing) insects’ movement in relation to two audio tracks played simultaneously from rock-shaped garden speakers – Frank Sinatra’s ‘The Summer Wind’ from the left hand speaker, and Michael Bublé’s ‘The Summer Wind’ from the right. In this test there were only pohutukawa seedlings in the vivarium.

In Search of Self-Perception, the first of the series, explored visuality and its primacy in human perception. Here the work ‘demands that we rethink pleasure as an exclusively human pastime,'1 challenging our assumptions about the natural world as well as critiquing contemporary popular culture.
Whether the insects preferred Sinatra or Bublé was not determined, but the resulting graph does suggest that they didn’t respond to sounds/vibrations etc.

1. Linzey, K., Place Makers, Wellington:Litmus, Massey University, 2011



Sinatra vs Bublé (The Summer Wind), The Engine Room, Wellington March/April 2011

Sinatra vs Bublé (The Summer Wind) is the second exhibition in a series of works using stick insects, again developed with evolutionary scientist, Dr Steve Trewick. In this work we observed 10 (non-hearing) insects’ movement in relation to two audio tracks played simultaneously from rock-shaped garden speakers – Frank Sinatra’s ‘The Summer Wind’ from the left hand speaker, and Michael Bublé’s ‘The Summer Wind’ from the right. In this test there were only pohutukawa seedlings in the vivarium.

In Search of Self-Perception, the first of the series, explored visuality and its primacy in human perception. Here the work ‘demands that we rethink pleasure as an exclusively human pastime,'1 challenging our assumptions about the natural world as well as critiquing contemporary popular culture.
Whether the insects preferred Sinatra or Bublé was not determined, but the resulting graph does suggest that they didn’t respond to sounds/vibrations etc.

1. Linzey, K., Place Makers, Wellington:Litmus, Massey University, 2011